The Fairytale that is the Lynn Glen Trail

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Sometimes what the soul needs is a daydream escape. Finally able to breathe after an onslaught of deadlines, we took to the road and made our way towards the coast. The roar of city life stripped away with every mile that we placed between us and Glasgow. Pop throwbacks from the 2000s and early 2010s blared in the car as I picked each song, connecting them to the car’s speakers through the magic that is Bluetooth. Singing along to the likes of Selena Gomez and Avicii, we ran through all the songs that had caught our generation by storm all those years ago

As we drove into Dalry, rolling mountains and staggering fields were sprawled as far as the eye could see. Even with three years of living in the UK, the beauty of pastoral life still brought a smile to my face. My friend chuckled as a I cheerily yelled out “Sheep!” or “Horse!” every time I caught sight of the farm animals. Reaching our destination, we parked the car near Lynn Bridge, a quaint stone construction, and headed towards the river.

Having parked at the end of the trail, we decided to start there, too. Spending the afternoon on the Lynn Glen Trail, five stunning sights make the charming walk a perfect way to spend an afternoon.

Faerie Doors

Existing in the histories of many cultures worldwide, the physical forms and purposes of faeries differ between countries. To understand how long these magical beings have been part of humanity’s story of the universe, it is important to note that the term is derived from the Latin word “fata”. This refers to “The Fates”, three goddesses of Greek mythology that spun the string of individual destinies, determining the length of people’s lives before they are born. In this context, we can understand that faeries are mystical beings that can comprehend our world in ways we can’t even fathom. One of those ways is their ability to travel between realms.

Through our walk, we were greeted by the sight of faerie doors. No taller than the length of our hands, each door was carefully hand-painted with the whimsical charm of childhood. According to myth, faerie doors are used as a means for humans to communicate with the spirited creatures. While we didn’t have any faerie sightings, we admired the tiny offerings of coins and sparkly knick-knacks that rested beside the homemade doors.

A Picturesque Cascade

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The largest tributary of nearby River Garnock, the side stream rushed on our left side as path twisted and turned with the steep cliff faces. On the right, statuesque trees stood tall and proud. Gnarled roots gave the impression of bowing, and sturdy branches jutted out over the path, their foliage providing a lovely shade. Our pace slowed to a snail’s pace as we admired each new perspective of Garnock’s feeder.

A Well-Ribboned Tree

Further along, we passed a moss-covered tree dressed in colourful ribbons. A handmade sign sat on one of the branches, declaring it to be the “Wishing Tree”. Ribbons are a common item for humans to gift faeries. Their heavy presence in on the trail suggested a long history of odd phenomena in the area explained away with the winged firms. Without ribbons of our own, we passed the tree hoping that the dreams attached to it would come true.

Lynn Falls

As we drew closer to the waterfall, the river began to stagger, preparing itself for the inevitable drop. Glances through tangled tree branches amazed us. What was revealed near the end of the path was more than we had hoped for. As if set into a small staircase, the river poured over levels of stone, past a toppled tree coated green. The water by the edge of the fall was surprisingly calm. Wanting to enjoy the full view, we waded through the water. The sight was worth the caution. Looking back at the river, skinny trees framed either side. Rushing water made for a stunning contrast in tones. The fallen tree called out to me, and I answered. Walking its length with careful steps and airplane arms, my mind was brought back to younger, carefree years.

A Charming Waterfall

Past Lynn Falls, a subsection of the river flows into what is adorably known as Lynn Spout, which ends in an impressively sharp 90-degree drop. Looking back, water falls off of staggered rock formations. The precision of their design gives the distinct impression that they were crafted and not naturally formed. We wandered around the area, climbing along the bridge-like form of a fallen tree. Walking through the rushing water, visitors would be wise to either tread carefully on bare feet or wear water shoes with reliable grips.

Things to Know Before You Go

Wear Form-Fitting Clothes

While much can be seen on the main path, we found that most of the stunning views could only be captured by climbing over rocks, carefully treading on fallen leaves, and weaving through numerous branches. That day, I was wearing a long coat that snagged on everything. Physical mementos of the excursion stayed with me in the form of leaves, spiderwebs, and bits of twig. To avoid turning your clothes into makeshift birds nests, wear form-fitting attire.

Make Sure You’ve Got Grippy Shoes

Underestimating the depth of a pool of water, my friend almost sprained his ankle, if not for the incredible luck of course-correcting and stumbling himself upright when he realised his mistake. Granted, he was wearing slip-on boots with smooth soles. It wasn’t the best choice for a day out, and he’s since stuck to trainers whenever we meet up.

When nighttime drew, we reluctantly left the trail behind. Singing along to old Selena Gomez songs, our expressions were bright with the fun we had on the faerie’s trail.

Wandering Around Oxford: The City’s Best Walking Route

During my fleeting four-day stay at Oxford, every single adventure began and ended with walking. Though I was staying at a friend’s house that was almost an hour from the city centre on foot, I didn’t tire from all the traipsing around. There was too much to see, from the classic architecture to the variety of life being lived in this fine university city. Students rushing from class to class, tourists armed with expensive cameras and comically large guide maps, stall keepers selling jewellery and collectibles designed to catch the eye, and crooning buskers who gave a smile to anyone who stopped and took the time to listen to the music.

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With all this walking, naturally my mind decided upon its favourite routes taken. Funnily enough, these three routes were all taken on the same day, one leading directly into the other.

The Oxford Botanic Garden & Arboretum, charging a small fee to visitors and students alike, is well worth the price of admission. Glasshouses hosted flora originating from tropical climes. The gardens were coloured with a myriad of flowers and herbs. Sturdy trees, their leaves expressed in the form of either a wide umbrella or arms lazily swaying in the air, provided plenty of shade and comfort. Everyone I passed by was in good spirits, enjoying this little piece of heaven tucked away in the city corner.

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Leaving the gardens, I headed along Dead Man’s Walk. So named for its medieval history as a processional path for Jewish funerals, its sombre past did nothing to diminish the peace and tranquility of the walk. Trees lining either side of the wide path kept the afternoon glare of the sun away. What light managed to filter through the leaves created wonderful shifting patterns on the dusty path.

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Christ Church College greeted me at the end of the short walk. Perfect for lovers of history, fantasy, and beauty, Christ Church was one of the filming sites for Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, its grand staircase utilised in the scene where harry met Draco Malfoy for the first time. In the College’s Great Hall, another fantasy world is brought to life. Housing the infamous Alice Window, all of Lewis Carroll’s most popular characters are immortalised in stained glass, from Alice’s signature sky-blue dress to the Dodo Bird’s brilliant plumage.

To all who have little time to enjoy the fascinating city of Oxford, I highly recommended walking along this path.

The Perfect Peak District

A visit to the Peak District can be summarised in one word: Perfect.

After a hearty breakfast at the cottage we were renting for the weekend, we piled into the car and headed off to start the day. Parking the car just beside Monsal trail entrance point. It is positioned right beside an abandoned set of railroad tracks that are now overgrown with weeds and grass.

Our walking path frequently shifted from dirt to timber bridges to large stones carefully arranged decades, or perhaps centuries, prior to today. A cool breeze was a welcome partner to the shining sun.

Alongside hiking among the rushing rivers and tall trees, we made the most of the day’s stunning weather and visited Eyam Hall. Visiting the site before its lease with the National Trust ended in January 2018, the modest estate was held by its founding family, the Wrights, for nine generations. A beautiful example of Jacobean architecture, the garden was as simple and effortless in its grace as the manor.

Driving back to the cottage, the sun was only beginning its slow descent into the horizon at seven thirty in the evening. As we headed back, I thanked my friends profusely for the day and apologised again for the copious amounts of photographs I had taken. They waved my words off and began discussing what to have for dinner. Absolute perfection.